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conception families fertility pregnancy Reflexology

Reflexology and endometriosis

Reproflexology and endometriosis – some numbers for you.

Reflexology and endometriosis:
Pregnancy – 65%
Live birth rate – 55%

Success rates from a data collection study of 180 cases, published in Reflexology for Fertility.

‘It is important to be aware that these results can ONLY be attributed to using these particular reproflexology protocols and no other form of reflexology’

Barbara Scott, ‘Reflexology for Fertility, a practitioners’ guide to natural and assisted conception’ (Watkins, 2016)

Endometriosis is a condition in which uterine tissues grow outside the uterus – it can develop around all your reproductive organs, around the bowel, bladder and vagina. Up to 25% of women in the UK who are ‘sub-fertile’ are thought to have endometriosis, and approximately 5-10% of all women of reproductive age.

Symptoms: pain during sex, heavy, painful or irregular periods, bleeding between periods, chronic pelvic pain, abdominal pain, bloating, fatigue.

Reproflexology techniques are designed to help you – by learning how your bodies work, using specific routines to support a regular monthly cycle, as well as any known conditions that may affect your wellbeing; by treating male partners as well to help optimum sperm health and using other tools and advice.

Book or call now for a consultation and assessment –https://weymouthbayreflexology.co.uk/appointments-fees/

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conception families fertility men Reflexology

Men’s Health Week 2020

During this week, I’ll be adding posts to my social media with links to useful articles on men’s health, particularly in relation to their fertility. In my practice, unfortunately, I don’t see men coming for ANY reflexology very often, and I’d like to see that change. The majority of the work I do now is reflexology for fertility – however, when I see the female in a couple, I often don’t ever see the male, or find out what’s going on with them. That needs to change.

It seems like the role males play in their own or their partners’ fertility is being ignored, or downplayed – either by the men themselves, or by their doctors. As men contribute 50% of the genetic material to a potential embryo, I’d like to change that narrative, and work with both parties, as it makes such a difference – not only in the fertility side of things, but emotionally and within that relationship, where both parties are included within the process.

Anyway, off my high horse for now, here are the articles and podcasts that I’ve found for you, which might educate and inform you a little.

https://www.thefertilitypodcast.com/season2ep9/?fbclid=IwAR0uSFjnM9RbuAps4vkm5P9nmDj-y9G4_NoukUtRYJsnmLE98Wn8K4TG6fU

https://www.menshealthforum.org.uk/sperm-faqs?fbclid=IwAR2oBlSC6us1pEhAyfGDI56dYMioXUdSzeSDVvWoK4aKbgMpjbsxVoWyTZM

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBgi9-ZARSp/

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBlkEdZpwpP/

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conception fertility pregnancy Reflexology

What is a short luteal phase? And why is it important when you’re trying to conceive?

The luteal phase is the 10 – 16 days between ovulation (release of an egg) and the bleed. The phase length is governed by the corpus luteum, a temporary endocrine gland which forms from the empty follicle after ovulation. The corpus luteum is responsible for the production of progesterone, which supports the development of any embyros until the placenta forms at about 12 – 15 weeks gestation and takes over.

If you are trying to get pregnant, a short luteal phase could hamper your attempts, as the progesterone needed to help establish a pregnancy may not be sufficient. You may have been diagnosed as sub-fertile or experienced early miscarriage.

A short luteal phase usually means your body is producing low quantities of progesterone. Signs of this include PMS, pre-period bleeding or spotting, cyclical headaches, weight gain, painful or lumpy breasts, heavy/long bleed.

Short luteal phases can be caused by many factors:

Stress (emotional, physical, illness, trauma, surgery) – the body can suppress reproductive hormones when the hypothalamus reacts to body chemistry changes

Undereating – another form of stress where the body reacts to being undernourished

Medical conditions – these may be undiagnosed, but coeliac disease and thyroid disease are known to be a factor

Can you improve a short luteal phase?

Yes. Changes to diet, lifestyle,specific supplements and targeted reflexology have shown improvements in lengthening luteal phases.

Balancing your cycle helps your body to work in harmony (remember homeostastis in my last post) and regulate itself.

What’s your luteal phase like?

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Babies conception families fertility pregnancy Reflexology research

What is the follicular phase (and why do you need to know about it when trying for a baby?)

Do you know what a follicular phase is (and why it’s important)?

The follicular phase is the first half of your monthly cycle. It can last between 7 and 21 days. Teens can have a follicular phase of up to 32 days!

It starts when a few follicles (6 -8) get to the end of their 100 day development to begin ovulation.

The follicle development is governed by the pituitary hormone FSH – follicule-stimulating hormone, which stimulates the follicles to grow. You have less FSH when younger, hence the likelihood of a longer phase, and more as you mature – leading to shorter or irregular periods.

FSH levels also contribute to how heavy or light your bleed is – the hormone stimulates estradiol which influences the thickening of the uterine lining. The more estradiol = thicker lining = heavier periods.

The maturing follicles stimulate the production of estradiol – oestrogen – which can promote feelings of wellbeing, happiness, libido by boosting your ‘feel good’ neurotransmitters of serotonin and dopamine. Oestrogen is also important for healthy skin, bones, muscles, brain, heart, sleep AND metabolism!

In short, the follicular phase of your cycle is likely to be the part where you feel most connected to yourself, feel happier and better able to cope with anything life throws at you, and if you’re trying for a baby – it’s the time when you are more likely to feel like having sex.

If you have PCOS (poly-cycstic ovary syndrome), you are likely not to be ovulating because the availability of the hormones you need to ovulate are suppressed by an over production of androgens like testosterone. Your body may be producing follicles, but they won’t be able to ripen because the FSH needed to mature them and move to oestrogen production is blocked by higher levels of testosterone and other male hormones. This means that the follicular phase just keeps going, without an egg being produced, making it very hard to conceive.

Can you regulate the follicular phase? Yes. Charting your monthly cycles is key to finding out what’s happening inside. As follicles take over 100 days to mature, three months of charts will give you great data on what has happened to get you to now.

This information can then be used to focus on changes that positively influence your hormonal balance. Amending your nutrition, lifestyle changes, specific supplements and targeted reproductive reflexology have shown improvements in regulating the follicular phase.

In a study conducted by the Association of Reproductive Reflexologists, the pregnancy rate for women with PCOS was 72% (live birth rate 57%), showing the effectiveness of regular reproductive reflexology treatments.

Balancing your cycle helps your body to work in harmony, and you to feel better.

What’s your follicular phase like?

Categories
Babies conception fertility men Reflexology

Varicoceles

Varicoceles – what are they?

A varicocele is an enlarged varicose vein, or a bunch of them which affect the testicles. Usually there are some more visible veins in the testes, sometimes you can only feel them. They are more common the older you get.

Varicoceles affect the temperature of the testicles – making them warmer – which is a bad thing for sperm production. They are a common cause of lower sperm production or decreased motility, so can affect male fertility.

Commonly, nothing will be done about varicoceles unless they are causing considerable pain.

Varicoles can be uncomfortable – current NICE guidance recommends supportive underwear for management.

However, if you’ve already got warmer testicles, keeping them tucked up in cosy pants isn’t going to help with the temperature.

What can you do to improve sperm health and quality?

*Check out my 5 fertility tips for men.

*Keep the scrotum cool – specialist cooling pants are available from snowballsunderwear (this is one brand that I know of, there may be more).

*Contact a fertility specialist (me 👋) to find out more steps you can take to reduce the impact of varicoceles. Targeted fertility reflexology can help ease the symptoms.

Have you got a varicocele? What have you been told about their management, or the effects on your fertility?

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conception fertility menopause pregnancy Reflexology relaxation

Re-opening soon

Exciting news! (The good kind 😊)

I am hoping to re-open the clinic in about two weeks time – around the 6th October, if I can be ready by then. Until then, you can continue to access my services online, and these will still be available once the clinic is open for hands-on treatment. This means I can offer a blend of hands-on and virtual services for you.

There’s a challenging amount of preparation to do – mostly admin, paperwork and cleaning, cleaning, cleaning.

I’ll be emailing current clients as soon as I have a date, so keep your eyes peeled on your inbox!

New clients – I will be operating a waitlist, so please GET IN TOUCH now, to be added to it. First come, first seen.

There will be some changes to how I work with you, but rest assured, it will be COVID secure, fully risk assessed and SAFE for both of us. I will let you know what changes are in place ASAP. I will NOT be offering facial reflexology until early next year, dependent on how the COVID situation changes – a moveable feast as I write.

I’m looking forward to putting hands on feet again soon!